Welcome to IPCS website.
Today is Tuesday, the 17th of October 2017.

Symposium





2016 Symposium - Reorienting the Postcolonial



The symposium was concluded last Wednesday. There were some fantastic papers and the videos will be available for viewing shortly.

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Seminar series





Panel discussion and book launch: Timothy Neale’s Wild Articulations



Jon Altman (Research Professor, Alfred Deakin Institute, Deakin University), Cameo Dalley (Postdoctoral Fellow, Anthropology, University of Melbourne), Chris Healy (Associate Professor, Cultural Studies, University of Melbourne) and Tim Neale (Postdoctoral Fellow, Alfred Deakin Institute, Deakin University) discuss the issues explored in Tim Neale’s new book: In Wild Articulations (University of Hawaii Press), Timothy Neale examines environmentalism, indigeneity, and development in Northern Australia through the controversy surrounding the Wild Rivers Act 2005 (Qld) in Cape York Peninsula, an event that drew together a diverse cast of actors-traditional owners, prime ministers, politicians, environmentalists, mining companies, the late Steve Irwin, crocodiles, and river systems-to contest the future of the north. With a population of fewer than 18,000 people spread over a landmass of over 50,000 square miles, Cape York Peninsula remains a "frontier" in many senses. Long constructed as a wild space-whether as terra nullius, a zone of legal exception, or a biodiverse wilderness region in need of conservation-Australia's north has seen two fundamental political changes over the past two decades. The first is the legal recognition of Indigenous land rights, reaching over a majority of its area. The second is that the region has been the centre of national debates regarding the market integration and social normalization of Indigenous people, attracting the attention of federal and state governments and becoming a site for intensive neoliberal reforms. Drawing connections with other settler colonial nations such as Canada and Aotearoa New Zealand, Wild Articulations examines how indigenous lands continue to be imagined and governed as "wild."
Timothy Neale is from Aotearoa/New Zealand and currently lives in Melbourne, where is a Research Fellow at Deakin University's Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation. He is the author of Wild Articulations: environmentalism and indigeneity in northern Australia (UHP, 2017), co-editor (with Eve Vincent) of Unstable relations: environmentalism and indigenous people in contemporary Australia, co-editor (with Stephen Turner) of Other people's country: law, water and entitlement in settler colonial sites (Routledge, 2016) and co-editor (with Crystal McKinnon and Eve Vincent) of History, power, text: cultural studies and Indigenous studies (UTS ePress, 2014).
6pm - 8pm Tuesday 8 August 2017
Institute of Postcolonial Studies, 78-80 Curzon Street, North Melbourne VIC 3051
Charges: Waged: $5, Unwaged: $3, Members Free






The Optics of Reconciling: the politics of visibility and visuality in the Canadian Indian Residential School Settlement Agreement



This talk explores the optics of reconciliation and the visibility of "truth" in the Canadian Indian Residential School Settlement Agreement, 2007 (IRSSA). The IRSSA is a legal settlement to redress the violence experienced by Indigenous children through Indian Residential Schools. From 1831 to 1996, federally funded schools displaced an estimated 150,000 First Nations, Metis, and Inuit children. The abuse, trauma, and violence experienced by Indigenous populations through this 150-year policy were and continue to be devastating. The IRSSA brought together a range of therapeutic, performative, and compensatory policy initiatives aimed at the reconciliation of Indigenous/settler populations, including a Truth and Reconciliation Commission and an unprecedented individual assessment program. Although reconciliation in Canada is premised on the revelation of historical truth, this talk explores how the Agreement structures access to or obscures the visibility of the truth: competing trajectories of visibility and invisibility work to mediate settler visualizations of Indigenous/settler relationships and, consequently, the possibilities for reconciliation. My analysis focuses on the physical and virtual visuality of reconciliation in Canada. I draw on my own experiences of the public TRC national events, centered on performances of testimony and witness and framed by multifarious streaming and recording devices. I contrast the TRC's ethos of visibility and revelation against the policy directives and actualization of an invisible, but monumental, "closed-door" assessment program, where Survivors were required to detail their most intimate experiences of sexual and physical violence for the Adjudication body and federal government. Ultimately, this talk challenges the efficacy of state-based justice and redress for Indigenous peoples.
Lara Fullenwieder recently received her Ph.D. in Cultural Studies from Queen’s University, Canada. Her thesis, entitled Unsettling Histories: Representation and Indigenous Creative Art Praxis in Official Indian Residential School Redress is an investigation of the role of visual strategies, art, and representation in reconciling Indian Residential School history in Canada. Her research interests include settler biopolitics, politics of representation, visual cultures, and critical settler methodologies. She is currently a Research Assistant at Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation, and is an Editorial Assistant for the The Visuality of Reconciliation Project at Queen's.
7:30pm - 9pm Wednesday 16 August 2017
Institute of Postcolonial Studies, 78-80 Curzon Street, North Melbourne VIC 3051
Charges: Waged: $5, Unwaged: $3, Members Free






Last Rites



A series of reflexions - intimate engagements - with the Australian condition. A broader underlying thematic approaches the implications of Darwininian thought in relation to the speculative/moralistic bases of the social sciences and what I shall call the impossibility of thought. In a world of ‘mattering' what matters?
John von Sturmer is a Senior Fellow at the Institute of Postcolonial Studies. John’s early career linked him with French anthropological fieldwork in Western Cape York Peninsula, principally among the Kugu-nganycharra. This formed the basis of his Ph.D research. In 1970 he was appointed the first lecturer in Aboriginal Studies at the University of Queeensland, in conjunction with the Australian Institute of Aboriginal Studies, Canberra. In the 1970s he was very active in the promotion of Aboriginal dance and ceremonial life. From 1978 - 1984 he was director of the project to monitor the social impact of uranium mining on the Aborigines of the Northern Territory. Other areas of engagement include customary law, land purchases and claims and the Wik Native Title claim. He has a long interest in Aboriginal art. He has taught and practised as a psychoanalyst.
7:30pm - 9pm Wednesday 6 September 2017
Institute of Postcolonial Studies, 78-80 Curzon Street, North Melbourne VIC 3051
Charges: Waged: $5, Unwaged: $3, Members Free






Panel discussion and journal launch: Beyond recognition? special edition of Postcolonial Studies



Recognition has emerged in recent decades as an almost universally valued moral and political horizon. Recognition claims underpin many social struggles, and animate the management of difference in both formal and informal arenas. Recently, critical Indigenous scholars Audra Simpson and Glen Coulthard have posed a fundamental challenge to this moral and political horizon. Writing particularly in response to North American settler-colonialism, they argue that the politics of recognition has functioned, not to ameliorate colonialism's negative effects, but to reproduce them. In this special edition, contributors respond to the important provocation posed by Simpson and Coulthard's scholarship, and extend their critiques into new geographic and empirical terrains including indigenous Australia, Papua New Guinea, Kenya and Canada. Collectively, the articles in this special edition explore complex and productive - if fraught - grounds from which to engage with the possibilities of being against, or beyond, recognition.
Co-editors Victoria Stead (Deakin University) and Samantha Balaton-Chrimes (Deakin University) with other contributors.
6pm - 8pm Wednesday 20 September 2017
Institute of Postcolonial Studies, 78-80 Curzon Street, North Melbourne VIC 3051
Charges: Waged: $5, Unwaged: $3, Members Free






The Rights/Rites of Girls and Goddesses



Priya Srinivasan, Vocal: Uthra Vijay, Veena: Hari Sivanesan, Tabla: Jay Dabgar . Join us for an evening of South Asian performance and discussion looking at the relationship between the goddess, subalternity and violence against women and girls in India and in Australia. How can we understand postcoloniality, neoliberalism and the crisis around control and representation of women's bodies in Australia through performance as a lens.
Priya Srinivasan is an independent scholar and artist based in Melbourne, Australia . She has presented excerpts of her award winning book "Sweating Saris: Indian Dance as Transnational Labor" in the hybrid form of "talking dances" at the University of Chicago, University of California, Berkeley, Harvard University, and Kings College in London. Priya Srinivasan has a PhD in Performance Studies from Northwestern University; an MA in Dance from UCLA and a First Class Honors in Ethnomusicology from Monash University.
7:30pm Wednesday 4 October 2017
Institute of Postcolonial Studies, 78-80 Curzon Street, North Melbourne VIC 3051
Charges: Waged: $5, Unwaged: $3, Members Free






Asylum, Borders, Security: Maritime Lineages, Global Prospects



In this paper I offer perspectives on the global politics of asylum, borders and security by paying attention to the maritime lineages of border security, and consider the global prospects for political justice and asylum seeking in the age of Trump's wall and Europe's 'Migrant Crisis'. I re-examine key differences in the framing of asylum seeking during the Indochinese Exodus, from 1975, and the pivotal emergence of a deterrence-led policy in the US Caribbean in 1981. Using Australia as a political laboratory where further developments proceeded from these maritime lineages, I look at the complex relations between boat-borne asylum seeking and the rise of civil aviation as a global middle class norm, and their interactions with the rise of coastal surveillance, the shift toward multiculturalism, and the rise of neoliberalism and skills-based 'temporary' migration to Australia's nascent global cities, Sydney and Melbourne. The contention I present holds that contemporary Australia's selective openness to the world is predicated on its systemic closure to boat borne asylum seeking, which implies the negation of asylum for a category of person as the offshored condition of multicultural prosperity. Finally, I consider the fully fledged emergence of border security as a two decade political project, one capable of restoring a seemingly threatened national sovereignty yet more fundamentally aligned with global logistics, and evaluate the fate of asylum seeking in the world of secured circulation it is now actively co-producing in Australia’s name.
Peter Chambers has just completed a full-length work that addresses the co-emergence of border security, offshore detention on distant islands, and onshore enclaves in global cities. In the coming year, the implications of this book are being further developed by focusing on the ocean in its immanence, the pervasive use of offshore, and the cultural effects of Australian border security’s stabilising social imaginaries. Over the next two years his work explores the normative implications of border security, offshore, and vulnerable noncitizen life. This seeks concrete ways of thinking about global political justice by regarding our common vulnerability through differential exposure to harm – through citizenship status, access to space, and conflict between modes of transport. Pete is a lecturer in criminology at Deakin University, and his recent current teaching has focused on terrorism, criminological theory, surveillance, global crime, and political justice..
7:30pm - 9pm Wednesday 8 November 2017
Institute of Postcolonial Studies, 78-80 Curzon Street, North Melbourne VIC 3051
Charges: Waged: $5, Unwaged: $3, Members Free


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