Alison Blunt and Cheryl McEwan (eds.), Postcolonial Geographies, (New York and London: Continuum, 2002).

Postcolonialism and geography are intimately linked through the spatiality of colonial discourse as well as the material effects of colonialism and decolonization. Geographical ideas about space, place, landscape, and location have helped to articulate different experiences of colonialism both in the past and present and the “here” and “there”. At the same time, while spatial images such as mobility, margins and exile abound in postcolonial writings, more material geographies have often been overlooked. Postcolonial Geographies presents the first sustained geographical analysis of postcolonialism. Exploring and developing the connections between postcolonialism and geography, the essays in this book – ranging across Europe, Australia, Asia, Africa, and North America – investigate the geographies of postcolonialism and chart the contours of a postcolonial geography.

Alison Blunt is professor of Geography at Queen Mary, University of London. Cheryl McEwan is professor of Geography at Durham University.